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Select Month: December 2007

Ergonomics for Construction Workers

Categories: Construction, Ergonomics

Construction is one of the most hazardous industries in the United States. Some of the most common construction injuries are the result of job demands that push the human body beyond its natural limits. Workers who must often lift, stoop, kneel, twist, grip, stretch, reach overhead, or work in other awkward positions to do a job are at risk of developing a work-related musculoskeletal disorder (WMSD) such as back problems, carpal tunnel syndrome, and tendonitis to name a few. The number of back injuries in U.S. construction was 50% higher than the average for all other U.S. industries in 1999 (CPWR, 2002). In 2005, construction employers reported 35,900 work-related musculoskeletal disorders that resulted in one or more days away from work for injured employees.

Armed with these and other data, we at NIOSH set out to develop simple and inexpensive solutions to make construction tasks easier, more comfortable, and better suited to the needs of the human body. The result: Simple Solutions: Ergonomics for Construction Workers, a new NIOSH publication consisting of “tip sheets” illustrating how different tools or equipment may reduce the risk of injury.

Workplace Stress

Categories: Stress

This is the time of year when we all may feel a little more stress due to the demands of the holidays. Unfortunately, stress at work can be a year-round issue further exacerbated during these months.

Work organization and job stress are topics of growing concern in the occupational safety and health field and at NIOSH. The expressions “work organization” or “organization of work” refer to the nature of the work process (the way jobs are designed and performed) and to the organizational practices (e.g., management and production methods and accompanying human resource policies) that influence the design of jobs.

Job stress results when there is a poor match between job demands and the capabilities, resources, or needs of workers.

 
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