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The purpose of this blog is to foster public discussion about injury and violence prevention and response and gain perspectives of those we serve.

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Selected Category: Violence Prevention

Bullying Then and Now: Talk to Children about Bullying Prevention

Categories: CDC Injury Center, Violence Prevention

Guest Blogger: Tracey Foster-Butler

Girl at her lockerHer last name is Flowers…but I didn’t think she was a delicate, sweet-smelling rose. She was more like a weed that squeezed the life out of me during my budding adolescence.

I can’t even recall how the bullying began. I remember always thinking about how to avoid her when catching the school bus, walking in hallways, and attending class. The threat of what she might say or do to me was always on my mind.

Core VIPP: Empowering States to Take Action To Put an End to Violence and Injuries

Categories: CDC Injury Center, Home & Recreational Safety, Motor Vehicle Safety, Traumatic Brain Injury, Violence Prevention

The headlines are all too familiar: A teen driver is killed just months after getting his license. A high school football player suffers a head injury after a tackle during practice. A mother overdoses on prescription pain killers. A youth is shot and killed after an argument with another teen. These tragic headlines make the news every day in states and communities across our country.

Teen Dating Video PSA Contest: Lights, Camera, Prevention

Categories: CDC Injury Center, Violence Prevention

How do you VetoViolence? Make a short film to tell the world, and you could win $500 in the “I VetoViolence Because…”: Teen Dating Violence Prevention Public Service Announcement (PSA) Contest.

I VetoViolence Because... Teen Dating PSA Contest

KIDS: Draw, Paint, Create— Be Heads Up about Concussion Safety

Categories: CDC Injury Center, Home & Recreational Safety, Motor Vehicle Safety, Traumatic Brain Injury, Violence Prevention

Heads Up Poster Contest on challenge.govWhen you watch a child’s creativity come to life, you can see how their imaginations help them describe the world around them. Through their artwork, they can share their thoughts and ideas with a peer, parent, or teacher. They can express their feelings and their important lessons in life.

If you give a child the opportunity to teach others about safety in their own words and images, you give them a way of reaching out in original and imaginative ways! With this in mind, CDC’s Injury Center is launching the Be Heads Up Poster Contest, which asks kids and teens (ages 5-18) to Draw, Paint, Create— Be Heads Up about concussion safety at school, home, or play!

Get to Know Risk Factors for Committing Sexual Violence

Categories: CDC Injury Center, Violence Prevention

Couple at homeEvery April, we observe National Sexual Assault Awareness Month. For our part, the CDC Injury Center’s year-round goal is to stop sexual violence before it begins.

National Public Health Week: “Public Health is ROI” – Saving Lives, Saving Money through Injury and Violence Prevention

Categories: CDC Injury Center, Home & Recreational Safety, Motor Vehicle Safety, Traumatic Brain Injury, Violence Prevention

National Public Health Week Logo: Public Health Saves Lives, Saves MoneyInjuries and violence kill 180,000 people each year.  Motor vehicle crashes, falls, homicides, and other types of injury events kill more people in the first half of life than any other cause — including cancer, HIV, or the flu. And they cost more than $406 billion in medical care and lost productivity each year. If you yourself have not been seriously impacted by injury or violence, you probably know someone who has.  

But what does that mean for public health? Where do injuries and violence fit into the plan to help people be able to live their lives to the fullest potential?

Can we prevent the Adverse Childhood Experiences that reduce quality and length of life?

Categories: CDC Injury Center, Violence Prevention

Abuse, neglect, and other traumatic experiences in childhood can shorten lives by 20 years and cost society almost $84 billion in lost productivity.

We call these Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs), and this infographic tells you the story of the dramatic links between ACEs, risky behavior and psychological issues. Safe, stable and nurturing relationships help prevent ACEs and ensure that children are able to live their lives to their fullest potential.

View the entire, interactive graphic on VetoViolence.org.

Every Child Deserves Safe, Stable, Nurturing Relationships: Why I Do What I Do at the Injury Center

Categories: CDC Injury Center, Violence Prevention

Guest Blogger: Sandra Alexander

Sandra Alexander M. Ed.My mother was a teacher during the time when teachers made regular home visits. Growing up, I remember going with her on some of these visits, wondering about the different kinds of homes, behavior, and environments of some of my school peers.

Some kids in school bullied other kids, others showed up at school with injuries, and some did not show up at all. My mother, in her calm, steady way, would explain to me that families had different kinds of struggles and that kids’ behaviors reflected the kind of environments, relationships, and challenges they have in their life.

Helping People Cope with Depression: Why I Do What I Do at the Injury Center

Categories: CDC Injury Center, Violence Prevention

Guest Blogger: Helen Singer, MPH

Helen SingerThis spring, after several of my close friends and family reached out to share the news that Mike Wallace, the legendary investigative journalist and “60 Minutes” anchor, had died, I sat down and had a good cry. It was as if I had lost a favorite uncle.

I know that it probably sounds strange that I was so personally affected by the passing of a famous newsman whose life was seemingly very different and removed from mine, but the fact is that Mike Wallace played a significant role in my decision to do what I do at CDC’s Division of Violence Prevention (DVP).

Seeing Creativity at Work in Injury and Violence Prevention

Categories: CDC Injury Center, Home & Recreational Safety, Motor Vehicle Safety, Traumatic Brain Injury, Violence Prevention

 

I still vividly remember my days working at a trauma center, treating victims of violence and traumatic events and working with communities to help prevent violence and injuries from happening in the first place.

I can clearly recall the faces and voices of children who came to the emergency department with injuries, and can still see the reactions of the parents who were told that their child had died from injuries; injuries that could have been prevented.  

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