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Selected Category: cardiovascular disease

A Call for Action: Responding to the Tobacco Epidemic and the Price of Cigarettes

Categories: cancer, cardiovascular disease, noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), tobacco

Woman smoking tobacco

“Raising taxes to increase the price of tobacco products is the most effective means to reduce tobacco use and encourage smokers to quit.” – WHO Report on the Global Tobacco Epidemic, 2013

Samira Asma, DDS, MPH - Chief, CDC Global Tobacco Control Branch

Samira Asma, DDS, MPH - Chief, CDC Global Tobacco Control Branch

Real People, Real Stories

Mehmet Nuhoğlu started smoking when he was in middle school at the age of 12 after hearing that real men smoke. Little did he know that 45 years later his two pack a day addiction would lead to a heart attack and then cancer. “I never thought it would happen to me. I still can’t believe it,” he says.

Featured in national ads similar to the US Tips campaign, Mehmet was one of the real-life people featured in Turkey’s anti-tobacco mass media campaign that was launched in the later part of 2011. He tells of his experience with cigarettes and what daily smoking ended up costing him- his voice and his health. Now speaking with the help of an electrolarynx (a device that helps users who have lost their voice box produce clearer speech), he confesses that he regrets smoking.

March 10-16 Is World Salt Awareness Week

Categories: cardiovascular disease, noncommunicable diseases (NCDs)

 

This blog was originally posted on CNN.com on January 23, 2014.

 

Grocery store

Almost two years ago, Philadelphia launched its Healthy Chinese Take-out Initiative with the goal of reducing sodium content by 10% to 15%.

CDC Director Dr. Tom Frieden

CDC Director Dr. Tom Frieden

The city’s Public Health Department worked with 206 restaurants, first evaluating their menus for sodium content and then helping them choose ingredients and develop recipes with less sodium. One way found to reduce sodium was for restaurants to cut the use of commercially prepared sauces and instead make their own.

After nine months, the initiative analyzed two popular dishes from 20 participating restaurants to see what changed. The result? A 20% reduction in sodium, more than the project’s goal.

It’s one thing to choose how much salt to add to your food when you eat. It’s another to live with decisions made by those who prepare your food before it makes it to the table.

September 29 is World Heart Day!

Categories: cardiovascular disease, noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), women's/maternal health

 

In honor of World Heart Day, the CDC Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention was asked to write commentary on the work the CDC is doing worldwide in reducing the morbidity and mortality due to cardiovascular diseases.

Barbara Bowman, Ph.D., Director, Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, CDC

Barbara Bowman, Ph.D., Director, Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, CDC

The theme of this year’s World Heart Day is one that touches everyone—the cardiovascular health of women and children. Though many women do not perceive cardiovascular disease (CVD) as the greatest threat to their health1, roughly 8.6 million women across the world die each year from CVD2. This is more than all cancers, tuberculosis, HIV/AIDS and malaria combined.  Women are not the only ones vulnerable to CVD. Risk among children is growing, due to increasing trends of unhealthy diet and physical inactivity. 

CVD is the leading cause of death worldwide. 

Yet there is good news: CVD can be prevented. Everyday heart-healthy behaviors, such as eating a diet low in salt, being physically active, not smoking  and promoting a smoke-free home environment, as well as avoiding the harmful use of alcohol can improve the lives of all people, no matter their age or gender. 

 
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