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Rabies Control: Three Months, Three Continents (Part 2 of 2)

Categories: infectious disease, rabies

   

September 28 is World Rabies Day, a global health observance that seeks to raise awareness about rabies and enhance prevention and control efforts. In the spirit of World Rabies Day, rabies program EIS Officer Ryan Wallace describes his travel around the world and how it affects global rabies prevention and control efforts. This is the second of a two-part series. Read Part 1.
 
 

The elusive EnKunga reportedly lives in small caves in Semuliki National Park, Uganda. This cave was empty.

The elusive EnKunga reportedly lives in small caves in Semuliki National Park, Uganda. This cave was empty.

 

PART 2 OF 2  

“Dr. Wallace, Taiwan is requesting immediate CDC assistance for a rabies outbreak. Can you fly out on Friday?”  

Ryan M. Wallace, DVM, MPH

Ryan M. Wallace, DVM, MPH

“Absolutely.”  

For the first time in over 50 years, rabies had reemerged in Taiwan. So I was on the move again. And in short order I would confront a gorge in Taiwan that plummets 3,000 meters (by comparison, the Grand Canyon is, on average, 1,600 meters deep). I’d develop a professional relationship with Taiwan Formosan ferret badgers and later, in Uganda, with what the locals refer to as EnKunga, “bats the size of goats.”  

Welcome to another day in CDC’s rabies program.  

Rabies Control: Three Months, Three Continents (Part 1 of 2)

Categories: infectious disease, rabies

 

September 28 is World Rabies Day, a global health observance that seeks to raise awareness about rabies and enhance prevention and control efforts. In the spirit of World Rabies Day, rabies program EIS Officer Ryan Wallace describes his travels around the world and how his work supports global rabies prevention and control efforts. This is the first of a two-part series. 

 

Two of Three: In certain areas of Uganda two in three dogs are not vaccinated for rabies

Two of Three: In certain areas of Uganda two in three dogs are not vaccinated for rabies

PART 1 OF 2

Ryan M. Wallace, DVM, MPH

Ryan M. Wallace, DVM, MPH

Rabies is everywhere, and it’s literally on the move. 

In the United States, rabies is found in raccoons, skunks, two species of foxes, and 16 different varieties of bats. All of these hosts make for a cozy biological home to many different strains of the rabies virus. Overall, 6,163 animals captured last year tested positive for rabies, but this is only a small fraction of the true burden of rabies in our wildlife. 

Yet few people die of rabies in the United States. 

 
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