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Selected Category: chikungunya

CDC Scientist Fights Chikungunya

Categories: chikungunya, mosquito-borne disease

investigation in Comoros in 2005.

Investigation in Comoros in 2005.

Ann Powers, Ph.D., Research Microbiologist and Chief of the Alphavirus Laboratory in CDC’s Division of Vector-Borne Diseases

Ann Powers, Ph.D., Research Microbiologist and Chief of the Alphavirus Laboratory in CDC’s Division of Vector-Borne Diseases

One of the most telling signs of the complexity surrounding chikungunya is that educating people on pronouncing the name correctly is perhaps the easiest challenge.

I’m exposed to that truth more than most.  And for the record, it’s pronounced chick-un-goon-ya.

As a research microbiologist for CDC’s National Center for Emerging Zoonotic and Infectious Diseases, my job is to better understand and occasionally chase (literally) an often overlooked, mosquito-borne, threat to public health; one that holds the potential to spread sickness and misery in the United States.

Chikungunya is viral disease that is transmitted to people by two species of mosquitoes that are present in the United States. Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus, often called the Asian tiger mosquito, can be found in about a third of the U.S.  They are the same mosquito species that transmit dengue in much of the tropics.  And while chikungunya does not kill people, the toll it inflicts ranks high on the misery index; it hits fast and hard and with almost no subtlety. People infected with chikungunya typically experience high fever and severe joint pain soon after they are exposed. Sometimes those problems are long-lasting.

 
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